Kaspersky compares Android security with Windows

by Klaus on May 25, 2011

in Android, Security, Tech News

Increasing security threats and issues on the mobile operating system, Android, has Kaspersky comparing Android with Windows in their recent “IT Threat Evolution for Q1-2011“:

Overall, the situation with the Android OS is becoming similar to the current situation with Windows:

  • There is a plethora of Android devices with outdated software which includes various unpatched vulnerabilities;
  • In the majority of cases, users ignore security alerts displayed when any application is installed or launched for the first time;
  • As with Windows, the most infected computers are those on which users have administrator privileges, the greatest risk of infection is faced by those Android systems which have been jailbroken;
  • Mobile malware communicates with its owners using a method that is widely employed by Windows malware – via command-and-control centers, which will ultimately lead to the emergence of mobile botnets;
  • Application control systems can be bypassed: applications can be installed on Android devices using means other than Android Market.

According to Google, 96% of all Android users are using an older version than 2.3 which was released in December 2010.

Like with Microsoft Windows, Android is on lots of different hardware platforms and the user can install software from all kinds of sources (compared to iOS where Apple controls the App Store software), making it harder to secure the system and easier to exploit.

Kaspersky also believes that we will see mobile bot-nets in the future where the mobile malware will communicate with its creators via command-and-control-servers, ie. the same method as used with Windows malware.

Just remember, if you’re using an Android-based mobile phone, don’t just say “YES” to all the security warnings when installing a new application, consider what permissions the application is asking for and if it’s really necessary.

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{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

DJ ARIF May 25, 2011 at 17:28

“Just remember, if you’re using an Android-based mobile phone, don’t just say “YES” to all the security warnings when installing a new application, consider what permissions the application is asking for and if it’s really necessary.” Hmm quite a good saying, I’ll try my best to remeber this words. By the way can you make a list of great Android Apps?

Klaus May 26, 2011 at 11:34

No, sorry, I don’t use Android so I can’t make a list of great Android apps.

Michael Aulia @CravingTech.com July 18, 2011 at 17:11

Problem is most apps require that security warnings as part of the license, so it’s like when you are accepting Facebook or Twitter apps.
In the end, we have no choice except for saying YES to install…..

Rob @ Atlanta Real Estate July 18, 2011 at 17:20

That is correct sir. Accept or don’t use.

Eliot Pearson May 26, 2011 at 01:00

You should always read the security warnings when installing apps on the Android device. This is even more important when you installing Apps that aren’t from the Marketplace. I wonder if there are any security check Apps out there. If not I may have to make one.

RonLeyba May 26, 2011 at 09:31

Thanks for the tip. Not all updates are meant to be installed after all. =)

Alex @ Jackrabbit.com May 28, 2011 at 00:31

Unfortunately, it all comes back to the user. A vast majority of the security problems with Windows is due to careless usage, and Android is no different, especially because potentially dangerous apps can be installed from anywhere.

Boris P. May 31, 2011 at 19:48

Its just my opinion but I think it’s just natural for a widely-used platform to be targeted for viruses, malware and other security issues. I mean if Apple or Linux are as popular Windows, there’ll be more security breaches reported.

Saying that, being an “educated” user is the best prevention still in my opinion.

Rob @ Atlanta Real Estate June 14, 2011 at 02:41

Been there, done it (with Windows).

Also been there and done it with Windows Mobile.

I’m no apple fan boy, but I don’t need all that headache with Android.

[email protected] June 19, 2011 at 21:41

Hackers are targeting mobile devices because the number of users using Internet on mobile devices are in huge numbers and increasing rapidly.

 

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